Landing gear

“There is freedom waiting for you,
On the breezes of the sky,
And you ask, “What if I fall?”
Oh, but my darling,
What if you fly?”
~Erin Hanson

Wall of flight in Dayton Children’s new patient tower.

“Recalculating” is not the command you want to hear while you’re making a major life change.

Or when you’ve been driving for nine hours on an interstate riddled with seemingly permanent orange cones and your copilots are a 95-pound Golden Retriever and an 11-month-old baby, both with a tendency to drool.

But – thanks to one stubborn GPS narrator – that’s how my life as a new resident of the Gem City began.

We did (finally) locate our apartment that night; it was an emergency trip to Dayton Children’s Hospital a week later, though, that helped us find our bearings.

It is a generally understood law of the universe that if you have just relocated cities by 300 miles, your child will spike a high fever before you’ve secured a pediatrician. (And said fever will appear at approximately 4:59 p.m. On a Friday. When it’s raining.) The first result in a Google search for pediatric urgent care directed us to Dayton Children’s.

I don’t remember how long we waited, what movie was playing on the lobby television, or how many other families were consoling tired children. I don’t remember what my son’s temperature was, or what I was wearing, or what car we took to get there. What I recall is the doctor who treated my son’s ear infection – and, in the process, allowed me to heal, too.

I came to Dayton for the potential of a new job and its proximity to my Tennessee roots, but in many ways, I came to Dayton to center myself after living in the fog of a community hardened by perpetual winter and declining industry. For my husband and I, moving to southwest Ohio – knowing only each other and nothing about the region save for what we’d seen on a recurring Weather Channel special about the 1973 Xenia tornado – was truly a leap.

My husband & oldest son before his second tympanostomy (aka “ear tube”) surgery at Dayton Children’s Hospital.

I don’t remember the doctor’s name; but I remember her kindness. I remember how I involuntarily smiled when I heard her Kentucky accent, how I nodded when she said she knew no one in Dayton when she landed here, how I was comforted when she mentioned her young daughter, who was just a few weeks younger than my own. I remember her favorite color was blue and that she loved Halloween and – as she scribbled her cell number and a “Call me any time!” on a prescription notepad – that she understood what it is to be somewhat unmoored, but in exactly the right place, all at the same time.

She could have berated us for traveling with a sick 11-month-old or rolled her eyes at our first-time-parent selves for utilizing urgent care for a mundane ear infection. Instead, she reassured us that all three of us were in exactly the right place.

And, indeed, we are.

 

Click HERE to see some of my favorite elements of Dayton Children’s new patient tower. If you’re in the Miami Valley, be sure to check it out in person at their Community Open House, June 11, 1-4 p.m.

Note: This post was written as part of Dayton Children’s new patient tower grand opening, for which participating bloggers received complimentary tours and a few hospital goodies. All thoughts and opinions (and genetically problematic ears) described here are my own.

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Above and beyond

Two milestones occurred this week: one of my city’s longtime institutions, Dayton Children’s Hospital, held its grand opening of a new, state-of-the-art patient tower; and I was officially called a “mommy blogger.”

I’m thrilled about the former; still processing the latter.

As a supporter of Dayton Children’s from almost the moment I arrived in the Gem City (read our story HERE), when a call went out to help elevate the conversation around their new building, my hashtag-loving heart responded. In the grand opening program, hospital staff said they wanted to create a space worthy of the children of the Dayton region. It shows.

Here are my favorite highlights from Monday’s tours.

Not your mama’s hospital gift shop

I never thought about how much gift shop purchases help fund hospital services, so I love that they’ve emphasized that. Also — this is seriously not yo mama’s hospital gift shop. This can only be described as a whimsical boutique. They have some seriously cute stuff! It’s not just bibs and balloons.

Snazzy technology

The amount of thought, research, and discussion with staff and patient families that went into this new tower is evident and impressive. Every corner resonates intentionality and a desire to, as they explained in the opening program, always be reaching for the stars for kids close to home:

  • Computer keyboards in the patient rooms are — wait for it — dishwasher safe. (I need these in my life)
  • There are separate parent/guest TV’s in each room (for everyone who has a limit on how many times they can hear Mickey and crew sing “Hot dog, hot dog, hot diggity dog.” Which is all of us.)
  • Dedicated space for both a NICU milk bank and lactation rooms for employees. YES YES and YES. I had an oversupply with my second son and loved the idea of supporting other moms in this way, and for all of us who have pumped in closets/bathrooms/cars/open cubicles — praise hands.
  • Disinfecting UV-light robots (umm, what?! I need to know how to install one of these in my house. #boymom)

Innovation top to bottom

I LOVED the soft rooftop play area. Clearly a safe and secure structure, it will give patients, staff, families, and visitors a chance to get a literal breath of fresh air and run out some energy while still remaining close to hospital rooms. And I love the innovative spirit here — most people would have overlooked the potential in this space instead of asking, “What can we do with it?”

Run, jump, play

There are people who appreciate kids; then there are people who understand kids. Dayton Children’s has installed interactive spaces throughout the hospital, acknowledging that kids are always curious, imaginative, and in motion. From the custom-built Windtunnel leading into the gift shop to the accessible hands-on Dragonflyer (you can move the wings and change the colors!), these are the little details that help families focus on individual moments even in the midst of difficulty. You know you have a gem in your backyard when you see a children’s hospital and immediately want to bring your kids in to experience it. (Come on — who wouldn’t want to measure their wingspan?)

Note: This post was written as part of Dayton Children’s new patient tower grand opening, for which participating bloggers received complimentary tours and a few hospital goodies. All thoughts and opinions described here are my own. If you’re in the Miami Valley, check it out for yourself at their Community Open House, June 11, 1-4 p.m.

How to register a 5-year-old for Kindergarten

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March 13-18, 2016
Notice Kindergarten registration is happening. Add reminder to phone to check on 2017 schedule in late February. Congratulate self on organized process and systems.

Feb. 16, 2017 | 7:30 a.m.
Drive past future school. Glance at marquee. Notice Kindergarten registration ends in 32 hours. Have panic attack. Attempt to un-teach future scholar new curse words. Anticipate curse words to surface again only during Kindergarten readiness assessment.

7:38 a.m.
Use smartphone to Google and locate school registration forms. Realize forms must be printed out and completed by hand. All 15 pages. Because 1952 was an especially efficient year for office personnel.

8:06 a.m.
Find list of additional required documentation. Call to confirm that we are applying for public school entrance, not entrance into the US of A.

8:08 a.m.
Call pediatrician’s office to get copy of immunization records. Enter the dreaded first-hour-of-the-morning-everyone-call-the-ped muzak. (Thanks, Flu ’17. You can go now.)

8:13 a.m.
Attempt to find car keys. Fail. Message husband re: meeting to exchange. Decide it will be first and last time I ever use the phrase, “Meet me in the alley.”

8:37 a.m.
Connect with a human being in pediatrician’s office. Request immunization records, this afternoon if possible. Am asked why I wasn’t aware of Kindergarten registration before today. Commence internal screaming.

12:05 p.m.
Begin completing paperwork. (Side note: Explain to me why we’re eliminating handwriting from the school curriculum when all of its paperwork still has to be done by hand. Isn’t it ironic? Don’t you think? #earworm #yourewelcome) Learn that falsifying your address on Kindergarten registration paperwork is a first degree misdemeanor. Finally understand where our justice system jumped the shark.

12:07 p.m.
Student Cell Phone: ___________________ Bahahahahahahahahahahahaha no.

12:08 p.m.
Dude. Daytime phone and cell phone are the same thing. But you would know that if you lived in a universe called 2017. Also? 47% of U.S. households don’t have landlines. So please stop asking for my home phone like you can’t make like Drake and just call me on my cell. #earworm #trackchange #yourestillwelcome It travels with me. That’s why it’s called a mobile phone. Because it’s mobile.

12:10 p.m.
Parent Input Form, Question 15: Does your child recognize some letters of the alphabet (first name)? … Seriously? That’s our highest expectation of Kindergartners? That sometime in the last 1,825+ days they managed to learn 15% of the alphabet??? Sweet mercy.

12:11 p.m.
Parent Input Form, Question 18: Does your child hold a book correctly? … I can’t even.

12:12 p.m.
Parent Input Form, Question 25: Does your child sort objects by attribute (color, size, or shape)? … Damn straight he does. He eats his M&M’s by color the way the universe intended. Want him to show you how to work the labelmaker? #TypeAalltheway #likemotherlikeson

12:13 p.m.
Parent Input Form, Question 26: Does your child show understanding of general times of day? … Yes, except for: on Christmas Day, on any day when mom is running 21 minutes behind, or every.single.Saturday morning.

12:15 p.m.
Parent Input Form, Question 35: Name three things you would like your child to be able to do in one year. …
1. Recite the preamble to the Constitution of the United States of America (while copies are still available).
2. Participate in clinical trials for medicine that causes five-year-olds to sleep past 6 in the a.m.
3. Successfully place socks inside laundry hamper without them being balled up.

12:15 p.m.
Parent Input Form, Question 37: Right now I am most concerned about: …
1. Your lack of a comma after “now.”
2. The carpal tunnel in my right hand from filling out 15 pages of repetitive paperwork.
3. Where I’m going to keep the magical leprechaun I’ll need to hire to watch my child during the 1,780 business hours he won’t be at school but the rest of the world still needs me to produce stuff. (Note to self: Ensure leprechaun can teach handwriting.) (Side note: Half-day-only Kindergarten, we in a fight.)

3:26 p.m.
Pick up immunization records on way to work meeting because everyone totes has nothing else to do between the weekday hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. SO WE SHOULD ALL OPERATE UNDER THE EXACT SAME WORKING HOURS SO NOTHING GETS ACCOMPLISHED. Suggest the penalty for picking up a virus in order to complete Kindergarten registration also be a first degree misdemeanor. Spray all the things with hand sanitizer. (Really, Flu ’17. We’re done with you.)

3:36 p.m.
Stop at house. Apologize to confused dog for interrupting Nap #29347. Locate all documents needed for applying for green card Kindergarten. Can’t remember passcode to husband’s super-secure-spy-level-Army briefcase. Throw entire briefcase into trunk.

5:15 p.m.
Pick up children from preschool. Explain impending adventure as “Visiting The Place That Hasn’t Heard About Google Forms Yet.” Ask Siri to tell five-year-old what “bureaucracy” means.

5:43 p.m.
Turn in forms. Intend to take obligatory picture with building sign but forget. Ask Yelp to find closest family-friendly establishment with wine on draft. Ignore husband when he says that’s not a thing.

5:54 p.m.
Call preschool and ask about permanent enrollment. PTA not scary there. Computers from this century there. Complex childcare system not needed for before school/after school/we’re-closed-because-theres-a-snowstorm-in-Kansas days there. DON’T LEEEEEEAVE USSSSSS.

6:12 p.m.
Ask five-year-old if he has any questions. Confirm that, yes, he may get a Minion lunchbox and, no, he will not be driving himself to school. Yet.

Sob. Sob sob sob sob sob.

The End.

Little lamb nursery reveal

Little lamb baby boy nursery | The Sensible Home

[This room was featured on Honey We’re Home as part of the HWH Loves Bloggers summer room series. Check out some of the other amazing nurseries HERE!]

What happens when you mix one part back-to-work-post-maternity-leave with two parts up-three-times-a-night-nursing-schedule and three parts work-crazytown-thanks-to-major-events-and-coworkers-with-personal-turmoil? A blog that doesn’t get updated, that’s what.

But one thing that did receive a major update this year was our nursery for Mr. Emmett, transforming it from a makeshift toddler room that we never decorated into a sweet, serene space for all things baby boy. Save for one small cross-stitch sheep that I have yet to finish and hang, the room has been complete since shortly after he arrived. Which is more than I can say for his baby book. Or photo albums. Or my mom’s one-line-a-day journal.

But we all remembered to brush our teeth this morning, so there’s that. #winning

The before:

Little lamb baby boy nursery | The Sensible Home

And, here are the “after” highlights:

Little lamb baby boy nursery | The Sensible Home

I wanted a classic baby-blue and white color scheme and fell in love with Restoration Hardware’s sheep line; the bedding and upper wall color (Cloud Blue) are from it. The sentimental side of me loves that both boys had RH Baby & Child-themed nurseries (check out Owen’s chocolate-and-sage nursery HERE). I don’t know if they do this every year, but RH had a big blowout sale right around New Year’s that I took advantage of.

The crib and changing table are holdovers from Owen’s nursery (Taylor line by Baby Cache) and have both held up very well. There are a few nicks — and a small rust-colored scratch that I suspect was caused by Woody from Toy Story dive-bombing off the mattress — that could easily be filled in with a paint pen. Or, I can just call it vintage-y and move on. The knit pillow (with sheep buttons — squeal!) was made by my awesome mama. She also made the knit baby blanket you can see on the ottoman. (Sorry, she’s mine.) The plush sheep is from Pottery Barn Kids.

Little lamb baby boy nursery | The Sensible Home

The monogram canvas was an easy peasy DIY project, which I can totally vouch for since I project-managed it and the hubs actually executed because he was afraid of paint fumes around the pregnant lady. I bought the largest canvas available at Hobby Lobby (20×30″ or something like that) and a 14″ unfinished wooden monogram from The Letter Shack on Etsy. The hubs did some sort of math voodoo that made my head hurt and figured out where to tape off the stripes with painter’s tape, then painted them in. We used Restoration Hardware’s Toast, which I got in a sample can for less than $3 during that New Year’s sale. The monogram was painted RH’s Cloud Blue, then attached to the canvas studs using small nails and a nail gun (we painted over the tiny holes one more time). Some wire on the back for hanging and it was done. Definitely my favorite part of the room!

Little lamb baby boy nursery | The Sensible Home

I was a fan of how I laid out Owen’s changing table from a functional standpoint so I recreated it, spray painting the Sara Bear diaper caddy Krylon’s Almond and swapping out his chocolate-brown changing pad covers for light blue ones. I’m a big fan of Carter’s minky dot covers, and found several of them this time around on eBay. The curtain rod is from Martha Stewart’s line for Home Depot, and the curtains are Lenda from IKEA. I also have Matlida IKEA panels that I meant to put up, but bought a single instead of double curtain rod by mistake. I also found THESE stick-on blackout panels to help with lighting (or lack thereof) during the day.

Little lamb baby boy nursery | The Sensible Home

The rocker is Stork Craft Tuscany’s glider with ottoman, an upgrade gift from the hand-me-down glider we had for Owen that was fully functional but a bit tight in width, making it uncomfortable the older he got, especially during feedings. This glider is wider and taller in back (hello, middle-of-the-night dozing) and has covered arms, which I love. The pockets on either side of the arms are super handy, and the cushions haven’t lost their shape at all. I loved the look of upholstered rockers, but when we test-drove them I hated how stiffly they moved and preferred the swinging motion of the gliders.

The lumbar pillow is also from RH Baby & Child’s sheep line and is both cute and functional as a mini-Boppy pillow (which came in handy with a baby who only wanted to be held for naps all summer). I took advantage of a Shutterfly free-poster sale in May and had one of Emmett’s hospital newborn photos enlarged to 16×20″ — the frame was on sale at Michael’s. (True story: I ordered this print during a 3 a.m. feeding from the Shutterfly iPhone app. Seriously, I would have accomplished nothing outside of keeping us all alive this summer had it not been for the good folks at Apple.)

Little lamb baby boy nursery | The Sensible Home

The Threshold Carson bookshelf I found during a furniture sale at Target. Some of its styling pieces:

  • The lace runner was given to me by my grandmother;
  • The picture frames are Hobby Lobby;
  • I used washable light-blue stamp ink to make the footprint/handprint on white cardstock, cut to size;

Little lamb baby boy nursery | The Sensible Home

  • The clock I found in an antique store and spray-painted Krylon’s Almond;
  • The lamp I found at a thrift store years ago and then added a clearance $5 lampshade;
  • The candle pedestal was picked up at Target several years ago;
  • The travel sleep sheep was a shower gift before Owen was born;

Little lamb baby boy nursery | The Sensible Home

  • The matching chicken-wire baskets I found at JoAnn’s;
  • The round picture frame holding baby socks was from my stash and also got the Almond paint treatment;
  • The name plaque is just an unfinished wooden plaque from JoAnn’s, painted RH Cloud Blue with cork letters (also from JoAnn’s) glued on;
  • And the shelf curtains are made from drop-cloth remnants (ahem) and held up by mini tension rods.

Little lamb baby boy nursery | The Sensible Home

Above the bookshelf is a basic peg shelf found on Amazon and a sheep garland I found on Etsy at The Path Less Traveled.

Little lamb baby boy nursery | The Sensible Home

The Willow Tree figurine was a Mother’s Day gift, and the silver frame was in my little sister’s nursery and then handed down.

Little lamb baby boy nursery | The Sensible Home

The sheep cross-stitch is Count Your Blessings by Country Cottage Needleworks; framing by Michael’s. The baby brush was mine, and I found the silver cup on eBay.

Little lamb baby boy nursery | The Sensible Home

I made the vinyl “The Help” quote using my Silhouette (I think the design was $1 or so) to go above my framed christening gown — find the how-to details HERE. Definitely my second-fave part of the room (other than the baby, natch).

The bottom half of the wall and the doors/window trim were a basic Sherwin Williams white, which we had a painting company come in and do for us. The hubs added the chair rail himself after they finished.

Little lamb baby boy nursery | The Sensible Home

Last but not least, I had to hang up this door sign my grandma made for me. I like to think it has magical grandma-induced powers to encourage sleepy babies :).

New baby, new room — and one more step forward in our ever-evolving quest to make this house a home. That’s enough of an update for me, for now.

Little lamb baby boy nursery | The Sensible Home{Photo by Kristin Jent Photography}

Check out my other room re-dos:

Turquoise & fuschia laundry

Turquoise & fuschia home office

Shabby chic foyer

Craftsman-inspired chocolate-and-sage nursery

Nourishment

Five must-have items for the breastfeeding mama | The Sensible Home #WBW2015 #breastfeeding{Photo by Kristin Jent Photography}

It’s World Breastfeeding Week, which is either seven days of advocacy and awareness or every second of my life right now. The theme of #WBW2015 is breastfeeding and work, and since I’m one week (and 180+ ounces of pumped milk) in to my return from maternity leave, I should have offered to be their poster child.

I nursed our oldest son for a year and plan to do the same with our youngest — only 278 days to go. And yes, I’m counting.

I am passionate about breastfeeding, but there’s such a learning curve, both in terms of finding my own way and in helping others around me learn, too.

It’s why marathoners proudly display 26.2 magnets on their car trunks — they trained, they cried, they pushed, they stumbled, they kept going; they did it. It becomes part of their identity, to say they accomplished this thing that, at many moments, felt impossible. That others told them was impossible, or too hard, or too uncomfortable to witness.

Breastfeeding is physically challenging. My husband spent his first Father’s Day out buying an electric heating pad so I could treat a plugged duct; I spent this year’s Mother’s Day stocking up on lanolin thanks to a newborn whose tongue-tie prevented a perfect latch. I’ve sat through church services praying not for salvation but for my milk to not let down as someone else’s babe cries four pews back. I’ve driven 125 miles home from a daylong business meeting, swollen and sore after forgetting my pump parts on the kitchen counter.

Breastfeeding is logistically difficult. I’ve expressed milk in offices, bathrooms and backseats so my son could have sustenance while we’re apart. I’ve improvised nursing covers out of burp cloths and pillowcases. I’ve watched 6-hour road trips tick upwards of 10 hours with each 30-minute nursing pit stop. I’ve interrupted dinner-and-a-movie dates and long-awaited full nights of sleep for pumping breaks that ensure my supply stays up.

Breastfeeding is stressful. I’ve sat in a doctor’s office, listening to a nurse tell my deer-in-the-headlights new-mother self I’m feeding my son too much; two weeks later, that I’m not feeding him enough. I’ve spent countless 3 a.m. feedings illuminated by the soft glow of Google as it answers my queries on football holds and oversupply and whether that glass of merlot will derail my son’s acceptance to Harvard. I’ve cashed in $200 worth of gift cards five days before returning to work, all in a panicked effort to find the holy grail of bottles for a picky 2-month-old.

But, mostly, breastfeeding — more than diapers or baths or hours singing Little Bunny Foofoo — is, for me, the most selfless thing I’ve ever done. I’ve learned to give of myself, even when the days are so blurry I don’t remember my own wedding anniversary and I’ve consumed so much fenugreek even my eyelashes smell like maple syrup. I’ve learned to put someone else’s needs above my own, even as I eat my weight in oatmeal and rotate through on-the-hour growth spurt feedings. I’ve learned to slow down, relax and simplify — not an easy feat for a Type A perfectionist. I’ve learned to be a better person.

Not everyone runs marathons. Not everyone breastfeeds. But it’s okay to celebrate when a person succeeds at a personal goal that takes incredible dedication and commitment — even if your life, and your choices, look different.

I’m proud of my run — no car magnet necessary.

Five must-have items for the breastfeeding mama | The Sensible Home #WBW2015 #breastfeeding{Photo by Kristin Jent Photography}

My Top 5 Nursing Mama Must-Haves

There are so many things I know now, 12 weeks in to my second round of motherhood, that would have saved me a lot of grief in the beginning. (Insider tip: Act like it’s 1975 and try latex bottle nipples.)

So, here are a few of my favorite nursing mama things. Grab yourself a nursing pillow, a charged e-reader and an industrial-size water bottle and get comfy.

1. Online resources. The KellyMom.com website is a breastfeeding woman’s bible. I’ve used it often to do everything from calculate what size bottle to give to remember how long pumped milk can last in the fridge. I also enjoy the conversations and camaraderie in social networking groups like Facebook’s Working Pumping Moms — sanity savers, right there. Because #sisterhood.

2. Lily Padz. You know you’ve reached a special level of adulthood when you have designated “around the house” breast pads (the paper ones are lovely, if you don’t mind wearing diapers on your chest) and “going out” (silicone) breast pads. THESE are the ones I leave the house in, and I love them. They’re tacky on one side, so once you put them on, they don’t budge. They’re also super thin and undetectable under clothing, and — most importantly — they work extremely well.

3. Total Baby app. This app deserves a post all its own, that’s how in love with it I am. I found it with my first son and it’s only improved since then. It tracks everything baby-wise, but especially feeding times, which side you last started on (because goodness knows I can’t ever remember, especially at 2 a.m.) and gives you daily/weekly/monthly averages so you know how he stacks up. The pumping tracker is especially robust and lists expiration dates, storage location and more. You can even export all the data in spreadsheet form via email to yourself, your husband, your doctor, your neighbor, whomever. A SPREADSHEET! OF STATS ON SPIT-UP! But if Excel docs don’t do it for you, I also really liked my Itzbeen timer.

4. Medela labeling lids. I adore these for marking pumped milk in the cooler/fridge, but I’m also a self-proclaimed label fanatic. (I’ve also use these removable date stickies from Inchbug, but more for labeling daycare bottles each day.)

5. Nursing nightgown. I splurged on a few new nursing nightgowns this time around, and fell in love with these from Baby Be Mine. Very comfortable — not too light, not too heavy, good length. Well-placed elastic around the arms and chest make it easy to nurse but also keeps you well-covered, making this a perfect choice when you’re around a lot of visitors. I wore it in the hospital and it instantly lifted my mood. Three months later and it’s washed really well and not stretched out a bit.

Baby on the brain? Also check out my Ultimate Baby Registry list.

DIY reusable Post-it frames

DIY Post-it Note Frames | The Sensible Home

After the success of my son’s Energy In a Jar teacher appreciation gifts last fall, our PTA group went looking for something equally crowd-pleasing to hand out during National Teacher Appreciation Week in May. Given that I was T-minus six days away from giving birth, I went looking for something fast and easy to assemble. Our pick: DIY Post-it Note holders. They’re made from basic acrylic picture frames, so the recipients can either add more Post-its when they run out or use it as a picture frame. Our inspiration came from THIS site.

For 40 teachers and staff, we spent just under $130 for all supplies, making them less than $4 per person. I bought 4×6″ landscape acrylic frames in bulk on eBay, the pens, Post-it Notes, and adhesive velcro on Amazon, and the scrapbook paper at Michael’s. If I had had time (and been able to see my feet without laying down), I would have inserted matching scrapbook paper strips into the pen chamber for an extra punch.

DIY Post-it Note Frames | The Sensible Home

I cut 4×6″ sheets of paper in matching patterns but different colors — so they would match throughout the school but allow teachers to choose their fave shade — then used square scallop paper punches I had on hand to cut out the message, which I printed on basic white cardstock. (Find a downloadable version HERE.) A couple swipes of an adhesive glue roller (I love THESE — but you can usually find any brand of these on discount at places like Ollie’s, Tuesday Morning, etc.) to adhere the papers together, and into the frame they went. I used hot glue to attach the Post-it Note pads to each frame, and adhesive velcro strips to secure the pens.

We had PTA volunteers deliver the frames to each teacher, letting them choose which shade they wanted, and they were a HUGE hit. I could see these also going over well for nurse appreciation, administrative assistants day, etc.

What have you crafted for someone else lately?

DIY Yarn-wrapped letters

DIY yarn-wrapped letters

For my first-ever post written while holding a sleeping baby, I’m opting for something short and sweet. Kind of like the baby. (Except he’s growing like a weed and I doubt he’ll grow to be so short, but I digress.)

DIY yarn-wrapped letters{Before}

Filed under “Projects I didn’t even put on my pre-baby to-do list because I doubted I’d get to it but then somehow did,” I updated the yarn-wrapped letters in Owen’s playroom to be a bit more equal-opportunity minded, replacing his name with the more generic — yet equally cute — PLAY. (See the original room reveal HERE.)

DIY yarn-wrapped letters

I didn’t try to be a perfectionist here — no hot glue or craft glue, just a bit of Scotch tape at the yarn starting point and then wrapped like a crazy lady until they were covered. I left the tops and bottoms open — the former because I was slightly lazy/hearing the nesting call to finish all the things, the latter because they stand up unassisted better that way. You also can’t see either given their placement on the wall shelf, so no point in slaving over details that aren’t noticed anyway. Now I just need to update the picture on the left — that baby isn’t the baby anymore!

Here’s to many more hours of playtime in a space all their own.

DIY yarn-wrapped letters{Real life, right here.}